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The medical charts on both sides, typical of those traditionally used by Chinese doctors, illustrate the acupoints along the stomach meridian. The medical charts on both sides, typical of those traditionally used by Chinese doctors, illustrate the .
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Yin / Yang and five phases

Yin has connotations of softness, darkness, coldness, and wetness, whereas Yang has connotations of hardness, brightness, heat, and dryness. In a human being, parts of the body are ascribed more Yin or more Yang qualities, as are all the physiological and pathological processes of the whole person.
According to the classical doctrines of Chinese medicine, health is achieved through the harmonious balance between the opposing forces of Yin and Yang. The attraction between Yin and Yang creates a vital energy known as Qi (pronounced "chee") or "Chi" which flows to all parts of the body through 14 channels called meridians.

A person who is unwell presents a predominance of Yin or Yang signs and symptoms. Illnesses due to excessive Cold penetrating the body, or characterized by signs of coldness - such as a pallor of cold hands and feet - are categorized as Yin conditions. Conditions due to, or characterized by signs of Heat are categorized as Yang. The treatment involves reestablishing a harmonious balance of Yin and Yang in order to restore health.

The Five Phases system also attempts to categorize all natural phenomena. There are five categories: Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water. The system has its roots in the observation of seasonal changes and the natural processes that occur during each season. Each Phase represents a stage in the annual progress through the seasons.

The Five Phases system also attempts to categorize all natural phenomena. There are five categories: Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal, and Water. The system has its roots in the observation of seasonal changes and the natural processes that occur during each season. Each Phase represents a stage in the annual progress through the seasons.

Qi ("Chee")

The Chinese concept of Qi has no parallel in the English or European Languages. It is often translated as "energy", "essence of life", "living force". or "vital energy," but these do not convey the complexity of its meaning.
Broadly, Qi is the life-force within the human organism, encompassing all the vital activities - spiritual, emotional, mental and physical. In this narrow sense, Qi takes on different forms according to its role in the life process.

It is Qi that gives life to all living matter and it is Qi which circulates along the meridians. Its flow and distribution depend on the balance of Yin and Yang.

The health of a person is determined by a sufficient, balanced, and uninterrupted flow of Qi in the body. Qi insures proper bodily function by keeping blood and body fluids circulating, warming the body, fighting disease, and protecting the body against incursions from the external environment, such as Wind, Cold, Damp, and Heat. If the circulation of Qi is disrupted or blocked, or becomes excessive or deficient, illness may occur.

There are two main ways in which Qi becomes disordered. There may be deficiency, in which case some or all of the functions are not performing properly or the Qi becomes blocked or stagnant, in which case pain usually results.


Meridians
1. What is Merdian
Although Qi (the flow of vital energy prounounced "Chee") or Chi is everywhere in the body, it does has main pathways along which it flows, nourishing and warming the organs and body parts, and harmonizing their activities. These channels are called the meridian system ("Jing-Luo" in Chinese). The acupuncture points are sited along these channels, and the herbs that a practitioner of the Chinese medicine prescribes enter one or more of the meridian pathways. The meridians can be manipulated by pressure (acupressure) or the insertion of fine needles (acupuncture) to treat disease and improve health.
2. 14 Meridian Channels
There are 14 main Meridians, and these correspond to the 14 main organs in the body, such as the Liver, Heart, Stomach, Kidneys, Spleen, and so on. These Meridians are bilateral - there is an identical pair on each side of the body. Some are more Yin meridians, with functions more to do with storing the vital essences of the body. There are the Kidneys, Liver, Spleen, Heart, Lungs, and Pericardium. The other six are more Yang Meridians, with function more to do with transportation of fluids and flood. These are the Bladder, Gallbladder, Stomach, Small Intestine, Large Intestine, and the Triple Warmer (a mechanism which regulates the overall body temperature and the Upper, Middle and Lower parts of the body). There are also tow extra meridians. One of which runs up the front center line of the body - Conception Vessel, and one of which runs up the spine - the Governor Vessel.
3. Meridians and Diseases

When we, being as the doctors of traditional Chinese medicine, talks about an organ being out of balance, we usually refers to the American related to that organ, not necessary the physical organ itself.

For instance, the Liver Meridian runs from the big toe, up the inside of the leg, through the genitals, and then deep into the Liver organ itself. There can be problems along the course of the meridian, and there is also a sphere of influence which each organ has within the body. The Liver controls the free flow of Qi generally in the body, including the evenness of emotions, digestion, and menstruation. It also store the blood, rules circulation in the tendons, has the major influence on the eyes, and manifests in the nails. It is therefore possible to see how diseases in these areas of the body may be treated via the Liver Meridian.

In illness, different meridians exhibit different tendencies of disharmony - for instance, the Spleen has a tendency to deficiency causing Damp. This creates symptoms such as diarrhea or lassitude (tiredness). The Liver; on the other hand, has tendency toward rising Yang, creating red sore eyes, migraines, and high blood pressure.

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